Asymmetric Ferroelectric and Magnetic Rings to Easy Recording Controllable Vortex Dipole Structures

Description:

Technology # 09-18

 

ULTRA HIGH NON-VOLATILE FERROELECTRIC RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY

The use of the asymmetrical ultrathin nanoscale ferroelectric or mesoscale magnetic  rings allows the application of an homogeneous field to redirect the dipole vortex so to save this dipole structure further in this nonvolatile memory device. This approach is an efficient solution, which technology has been looking so far, as the effective writing procedure allows the use of simple devices like electromagnet (for magnets) or electric battery (for ferroelectrics) to accomplish the desired control of the dipole vortices.

The advantage of the ferroelectric memory devices operated with the help of this invention is a possible extremely high density of the memory elements reachable because of the extremely small size of the ferroelectric nanoring possessing the desired dipole structure. The minimal size Of One memory element is of 4 nm. The elements do not produce any field around that solves the problem of the influence Of one memory element on another one.

 

Application(s):

the use of ferroelectricity in nanoscalestructures can be applied to piezoelectric sensors, efficient actuators, nanoscale dielectric capacitors for energy storage, and nanoscale ultrasounds for medical use.

 

Advantage(s):

The ferroelectric memory devices operate with the help of this invention is a possible extremely high density of the memory elements reachable because of the extremely small size of the ferroelectric nanoring possessing the desired dipole structure. The minimal size Of One memory element is of 4 nm. The elements do not produce any field around that solves the problem of the influence Of one memory element on another one.

 

Technology:

A very high speed of the switching demonstrated by our calculations (in the microwave region, at GHz frequency) is a special advantage of our invention.

In contrast with usual ferroelectric devices like electromechanical transducers, our invention does not suffer from the presence Of a surface layer because the dipoles are arranged so to look in parallel to the surface (the perpendicular direction of the dipoles in the transducers make them dependable, very much so, on the surface).

University of Arkansas physicists have shown that lowdimensional nanoscale structures of piezoelectric materials retain their ferroelectric properties even though the piezoelectric effect disappears at the nanoscale. What happens is that the polarization of the material at the nanoscale produces a vortex where the charges swirl in a circular
pattern, so that they cancel each other. The vortex of charge can then have either a clockwise or counterclockwise spin which opens up the possibility of using the spin state of the vortex to stand for either a “1” or a “0”. Simulations by the scientists resulted in a method of changing the spin state of the vortex – allowing the possibility of writing a “1” or a “0” on each specific nanostructure such as a nanodot. The ability to change the spin state of the nanodot is based on the application of inhomogenous electric fields. Static electric charges can be placed near the nanodot and when they are switched or moved, the spin of the nanodot changes. Nanodots can then be used as memory cells, and because of the very small size of the nanodots, the density of the memory elements can go up dramatically from the 1 billion bits per square inch now achieved with magnetic recording to 80 trillion bits per square inch, or about 4 orders of magnitude greater memory density. The use of nanodots of ferroelectric material to store information is especially helped by the use of the vortex spin state to record the bits, because the vortex has a closed electric field that will not interact with neighboring nanodots, thus eliminating crosstalk between the memory elements. Crosstalk in conventional memory cell capacitors requires the use of passgate transistors to deal with the problem of cross talk.

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This invention is available for license.

For interested parties seeking further information, feel free to contact:

 

Mark Allen Lanoue

Technology Manager / Tech Ventures

University of Arkansas

(479) 575-7243

malanoue@uark.edu

 

Patent Information:
For Information, Contact:
Mark Lanoue
Technology Manager
University of Arkansas
479-575-7243
malanoue@uark.edu
Inventors:
Laurent Bellaiche
Igor Kornev
Sergey Prossandeev
Keywords:
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